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How it works:

  • Share your skin goals and snap selfies

  • Your dermatology provider prescribes your formula

  • Apply nightly for happy, healthy skin

Is acne infectious? Here’s what the experts say

Spoiler alert! You can’t catch acne.

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Curology Team
Aug 08, 2022 · 7 min read

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We’re here to share what we know — but don’t take it as medical advice. Talk to your medical provider if you have questions.
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  3. > Is acne infectious? Here’s what the experts say

If you’re like most people, chances are you’ve had acne breakouts or the occasional pimple pop-up. As frustrating as acne can be, for many of us, it’s a normal part of life. Acne is one of the most common skin conditions in the United States, affecting up to 50 million Americans every year.¹ Nevertheless, it can also be somewhat multifactorial when it comes to knowing what causes it or why it occurs. But have you ever wondered if acne is contagious or infectious? We’re here to answer your acne-related skincare questions and help you on your journey to healthier skin.

Is acne infectious?

Good news! The simple answer is no. It’s impossible to “catch” acne the same way you catch a cold. Acne is an inflammatory skin condition caused by a variety of factors, but being in contact with or around people with acne is not one of them. 

Can acne spread?

Acne isn’t infectious, but if you squeeze or pick at pimples and frequently touch your face, there is a chance that you could spread acne-causing bacteria or oil and cause more pimples. The same goes for makeup brushes and other things that touch your face (like your phone). While acne isn’t contagious, it is possible to transfer dirt and oil to your skin that could potentially clog your pores and contribute to acne.²

What are the contributing factors to acne? 

We know that acne is neither infectious or contagious. So what are the causes of acne?Because acne is multifactorial, the answer to this isn’t so simple. Here are some of the most common contributing factors to acne:

  • Genetics. One potential factor is family history. But before you start blaming your parents, don't panic. Acne is still very treatable even when there’s a hereditary component.

  • Hormones. People often associate acne with puberty, but it’s actually the changes in hormone levels that happen during puberty that can lead to acne. An increase in androgen hormones during adolescence causes the sebaceous glands to enlarge and produce more sebum (oil).³ Adult acne can also be triggered by hormonal fluctuations, particularly around menstrual cycles.⁴

  • Stress. Stress doesn't directly cause acne, but it has been linked to worsening breakouts. Our advice? Take a deep breath and take time to do whatever works for you to keep stress at bay. Whether it's spending time with friends, exercising, or enjoying a relaxing cup of herbal tea, your skin will thank you.

  • Diet. Your diet is another possible contributing factor when it comes to acne. Some studies suggest a low glycemic diet may reduce pimples, while others suggest cow's milk could worsen acne in some people.⁵ This doesn’t mean you need to give up your favorite foods. Instead, pay attention to what you think could be triggering breakouts, and remember, everyone’s skin is different. What works for one person may not work for another.

  • Exercise. Exercise is good for overall health, but aspects of exercise may encourage breakouts. During exercise, form-fitting workout clothes can repeatedly rub on your skin to create friction and irritation. When your skin gets hot and sweaty, bacteria can thrive and pores can get clogged (aka acne mechanica). Sweat can also mix with makeup and oil on your skin, which may clog your pores and lead to breakouts.

What is acne? How does it appear? 

Now that we’ve established some potential causes of acne, let’s talk about the different types of acne and how they can occur. Acne can appear when hair follicles clog with dead skin cells and oil (sebum). Cutibacterium acnes (C. acnes), one of the bacteria normally found on our skin, thrives in the excess oil, leading to the inflammation you may notice with certain acne lesions.⁶ Acne vulgaris is a medical term that refers to a combination of different types of acne lesions,⁷ but knowing the specific type or types of acne lesions you’re experiencing can help determine which treatment will be effective.

  • Whiteheads and blackheads. These are comedonal acne. They occur when the hair follicle gets clogged with sebum and dead skin cells. A whitehead is a closed comedones, while a blackhead is open and exposed to the air.⁸

  • Papules. Papules are red and inflamed bumps. They are inflammatory acne lesions.

  • Pustules. Like papules, pustules are also inflammatory acne, except they’re filled with a white liquid called pus.⁹

  • Cysts and nodules. Cysts and nodules are a more severe type of acne; they are found deep under the surface of the skin and may cause acne scarring. Cysts are filled with pus, while nodules are harder, painful lumps.

How to help prevent acne

We know acne is complicated—and it’s not always easy to get rid of. Luckily, there are some simple yet effective steps you can take that may help prevent breakouts.

  1. Use a gentle cleanser regularly. When it comes to washing your face, it’s like goldilocks finding the perfect porridge. Too much can dry out or irritate your skin, but you still want to regularly cleanse your skin of bacteria and buildup. Experts recommend washing your face twice daily, once in the morning and again at night or after excessive sweating.¹⁰

  2. Keep popping in the past. Tempting as it may be, popping a pimple is typically not a good idea unless done by a dermatology provider. You could potentially cause the pimple to become more inflamed or scar.¹¹

  3. Moisturize. Don’t let your skin dry out, especially if you’re using acne treatments with vital active ingredients. Dry and irritated skin is more prone to breakouts, so be sure to use a great face cream at the end of your skincare routine to keep your skin feeling moisturized.

  4. Use non-comedogenic products. A sneaky cause of acne could be your hair care products or the makeup you wear. Look for products that are labeled non-comedogenic to avoid any pesky pore-clogging ingredients.

  5. Spread acne medication evenly. Unless otherwise directed by a medical provider, spread a thin layer of your acne medication on all acne-prone skin. Whether a retinoid like tretinoin or a topical antibiotic such as clindamycin, typically you want to apply your go-to acne-fighting treatment to all acne-prone areas and not just active breakouts. 

  6. Exfoliate in moderation. Exfoliation can be great for your skin, but make sure you’re not overdoing it. While it might be tempting to try and literally scrub away all your bumps and blemishes, this can irritate your skin and lead to more breakouts.

What are some products that can help with acne? 

Acne is stubborn but very treatable! To help you take some of the guesswork out of the process, we put together a short list of effective acne treatments  that may help:

  • Benzoyl peroxide cream or face wash. Benzoyl peroxide is often used to treat acne because it fights the bacteria that contribute to acne.¹² You can find benzoyl peroxide in many cleansers or in spot treatments. 

  • Smooth on the salicylic acid. If you’ve ever tried an acne-fighting face wash, chances are salicylic acid may have been involved. A chemical exfoliant that helps remove dead skin cells, salicylic acid is a great ingredient to help keep pores free of debris.¹³

  • Reach for the retinoids. Adapalene is an over-the-counter option, while tretinoin is available with a prescription. Retinoids help unclog pores and have the added bonus of reducing the appearance of fine lines.¹⁴ 

Curology can help

When it comes to taking care of your skin, we’re here to help. Curology was founded in 2014 by Dr. David Lorschter, MD, a board-certified dermatologist. It’s simple: you tell us about your skin, and one of our dermatology providers will consult you about your skincare routine. If Curology is right for you, we’ll prescribe you a personalized prescription formula with a mix of ingredients chosen for your unique needs. 

Get your personalized skincare routine with Curology

Subject to consultation. 30-day trial. Just cover $4.95 in S&H.
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Curology is free to start—you’ll get a personalized formula, plus any of our recommended skincare products, for just $4.95 (plus tax)* to cover shipping and handling. That’s a full skincare routine designed by dermatologists and sent straight to your door. The best part? Curology is custom-tailored to you. That means we can tweak your prescription formula over time, and you can always update what’s in your box. So what are you waiting for? Go ahead and start your Curology free trial now.

FAQs

Is acne infectious?

Acne is an inflammatory skin condition caused by a variety of factors, but being in contact with or around people with acne is not one of them.

Can acne spread?

Acne isn’t infectious, but if you squeeze or pick at pimples and frequently touch your face, there is a chance that you could spread acne-causing bacteria or oil and cause more pimples.

What is acne? How does it appear?

Acne can appear when hair follicles clog with dead skin cells and oil (sebum). Cutibacterium acnes (C. acnes), one of the bacteria normally found on our skin, thrives in the excess oil, leading to the inflammation you may notice with certain acne lesions.

• • •

P.S. We did the research so you don’t have to:

  1. American Academy of Dermatology. Skin Conditions By The Numbers. (n.d.).

  2. American Academy of Dermatology. 10 skin care habits that can worsen acne. (n.d.).

  3. American Academy of Dermatology. Acne: Who gets and causes. (n.d.).

  4. Elsaie, Mohamed L. Hormonal treatment of acne vulgaris: an update.Clinical, cosmetic and investigational dermatology. Clinical, cosmetic, and investigational dermatology. (2016).

  5. American Academy of Dermatology. Can the right diet get rid of acne?. (n.d.).

  6. Toyoda, M., & Morohashi, M. Pathogenesis of acne. Medical electron microscopy : official journal of the Clinical Electron Microscopy Society of Japan. ( March 2001).

  7. Oakley A. Acne Vulgaris. DermNet NZ. (July 2021).

  8. Sutaria AH, Masood S, Schlessinger J. Acne Vulgaris. StatPearls Publishing. (Updated 2022 May 8)).

  9. Cleveland Clinic. Acne. (n.d.)

  10. American Academy of Dermatology. 10 skin care habits that can worsen acne. (n.d.).

  11. American Academy of Dermatology. Pimple popping: Why only a dermatologist should do it. (n.d.).

  12. Kawashima, Makoto et al. Clinical efficacy and safety of benzoyl peroxide for acne vulgaris: Comparison between Japanese and Western patients. The Journal of dermatology. ( November 2017).

  13. Jacqueline Woodruff, et al.  A double-blind, placebo-controlled evaluation of a 2% salicylic acid cleanser for improvement of acne vulgaris.(2013, April 1).

  14. Leyden, J., Stein-Gold, L., & Weiss, J. (2017). Why Topical Retinoids Are Mainstay of Therapy for Acne.Dermatology and therapy. (2017, June 5).

*Cancel anytime. Subject to consultation. Trial is 30 days.

• • •
Our medical review process:We’re here to tell you what we know. That’s why our information is evidence-based and fact-checked by medical experts. Still, everyone’s skin is unique—the best way to get advice is to talk to your healthcare provider.
Our policy on product links:Empowering you with knowledge is our top priority. Our reviews of other brands’ products in this post are not paid endorsements—but they do meet our medically fact-checked standards for ingredients (at the time of publication).
Curology Team Avatar

Curology Team

Kristen Jokela, NP-C

Kristen Jokela, NP-C

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